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Annie Peavy

14PFOC1607AnniePeavyCopyrightSusanJStickle.comAnnie Peavy Website: http://www.anniepeavydressage.com

 

Biography
Date of Birth:          August 12, 1996
Birthplace:              Hartford, Connecticut
Hometown:             Avon, Connecticut
Height:                     5’ 6”
Parents:                   Rebecca ‘Becky’ Reno & Ed Peavy
Siblings:                   Bridgette (1990), John (1995)
Education:              Senior at Ethel Walker School, Simsbury, CT
Sport:                       Para-Dressage Grade III

Riding Career
Partially paralyzed on her left side by a stroke she suffered prior to birth, Annie began riding horses as a form of physical therapy. What began as a way for a four-year-old to improve her mobility turned into her life’s passion.
Annie’s love of horses can be traced back to her best friend in preschool, Sage Armstrong, who had horses at her home. Annie soon started taking lessons at the local barn and things took off from there. Annie asked her parents if she could get her own horse as soon as she learned to canter. They compromised and agreed that when she was 10 they would look for a horse. They found Baby Blue who became part of the family. Blue is still Annie’s first love and lives on a beautiful farm in Vermont, where Annie visits as much as possible.
As her love of dressage grew, Annie convinced her mom to take dressage vacations to Portugal, where Annie took three lessons per day. It is there where Annie first learned about para-dressage. After Annie returned home, a friend gave her an article about para-dressage, and from that moment on Annie started working toward her goal of representing the US at the World Equestrian Games and the Paralympics.
It was a couple of years later, in 2013, that Annie and her mom went to a Heather Blitz clinic and Annie knew that she had found the right trainer. They moved the horses to Heather’s training center at Cutler Farm in Medfield, MA, which is a two-hour car ride from their home. For the past year Annie has commuted five times a week to train with Heather. That training has paid off as Annie has won multiple blue ribbons in international Grade 3 para-dressage competitions, including three classes and overall at the WEG selections in Gladstone. Annie started riding the FEI Junior test this spring to complete her bronze medal.

Current Competition Horses
- Lancelot Warrior;
2002 17.0 hh Hanoverian gelding (Londonderry x Waroness – Warkant)
- Ozzy Cooper;
2006 17.0 hh Trakehner gelding (Hibiskus x Okka – Arrak)
Stuart Little – 1999 Dutch Warmblood gelding – was Annie’s first dressage horse, and together they became the 2011 Dressage 4 Kids Champion. In 2011 Annie celebrated her 16th birthday by riding her first freestyle program on Stuart Little.

Factoids
One of Annie’s hidden talents is that she knows the words to almost any song on the radio, which she credits to driving four hours in the car each day.
Annie loves her school friends and doesn’t like not being with them through the school year, but she also loves the people she has gotten to know around the world through her riding.
Annie left the show at HITS in Upstate New York this spring to go to her prom in Connecticut on Saturday afternoon. She was back the next morning to watch Heather Blitz show Paragon and then show her own horses in the Junior Class.
Earlier this year, her new horses were delayed in flying to America, so she used the opportunity to spend January in Denmark getting to know them.
When she is not with her horses, Annie enjoys traveling with her family around the world to places like France, Germany, the Czech Republic, Israel, England, Denmark and India, as well as closer to home in California, Wyoming and the Caribbean.
Annie also travels as much as she can with her friend Sage Tourigny.
Annie has a large extended family that spans the country, and they are all very supportive of her riding career.

Cambry Kaylor

CambryKaylorStoryinSidelines March 2014JPG

 

Story in Sidelines March 2014:

Cambry Kaylor: From Equestrian Vaulting to Para-Dressage

By: Lindsay McCall

On June 21, 2005, 18-year-old equestrian vaulter Cambry Kaylor showcased her last dismount and in moments lost the use of her legs. After a successful practice with her vaulting team for the proceeding National Championships, Cambry did her aerial dismount off of her horse. This was a move she perfected and had done many times prior. Cambry explained, “I decided to do my aerial dismount off the horse, but didn’t communicate it to my teammate still on the horse. I flipped, hit him with my leg, changed my rotation in the air and landed on my back. I broke my back, severed my spinal cord and became permanently paralyzed from the waist down.” As an 18-year-old talented athlete Cambry was a diver, cheerleader, dancer, and equestrian vaulter. She remembered thinking in that moment that she really hurt herself, would be out for the season, but she would be back competing the following year. “I didn’t think it’d be the last time I vaulted, let a lone the last time I had the use of my legs,” recalled Cambry. Cambry was born in Thousand Oaks, CA, but grew up mainly in Woodinville, WA. During her high school years she lived in Fairfield, CA, before moving to Highland Utah. As an eight year old, Cambry began her path through the equestrian sport after reading an article in American Girl magazine. She read about a mother and daughter duo in California who performed gymnastics and dance on the back of a moving horse. For Cambry who had been in ballet since she could walk, gymnastics since she was 5 years of age and a horse crazy little girl, this was the perfect combination of all three. It would not be long before Cambry had her mom calling the American Vaulting Association to find the nearest club to join and her lifelong journey with horses would begin. That same year, Cambry began vaulting with Redwing Vaulters out of Redmond, WA. Her vaulting career blossomed over her life becoming a vaulter on a National Championship C-Team and 2-phase team while vaulting in Washington. She earned her silver medal and vaulted as a flyer on Tambourine Vaulters A-Team when she moved to California. In 2005, in her last year of vaulting, she vaulted with Oak Hills Vaulters out of Utah as a flyer on their A-team. Cambry explains how vaulting holds a special place in her heart, “I love the challenge, the adrenaline, and that magical moment when the music, horse and vaulter become one. Vaulting taught me hard work, teamwork, perseverance, sportsmanship, balance, respect and gratitude for the most important member of the team, the horse.” After Cambry’s accident she spent a relatively short time in rehabilitation. Her therapists said she would be in therapy for two to three months, but Cambry made it through in five weeks just in time to see her team compete at the National Championships. Her rehabilitation did not end after those five intense weeks. “I quickly ‘recovered’ in that I could independently live from a wheelchair, but from an emotional standpoint, it took much longer,” remembered Cambry. “A couple weeks after being discharged from the hospital, I moved into the dorms at Brigham Young University and began my freshman year as previously planned. I had a hard time in the beginning trying to find myself without the things I had previously used to identify myself. I had been a diver, cheerleader, dancer, and vaulter. I had been an athlete. I didn’t know who I was anymore without my legs. I wanted my old life back.” Using the oldest rule in Riding 101 she got back on the horse. Only months after her accident, Cambry was lifted on the back of a horse and ponied around at the walk. It was a bittersweet moment. It was an amazing feeling for her because she felt as though she was walking through the horse’s movement. However, it was not the same as she remembered. “I wasn’t ready,” said Cambry. “I tried a few more times after to ride, but it ended up just reminding me of what I had lost.” Around that same time, Cambry would find herself a new way of working with the sport she loved. Her previous vaulting team invited her back to the barn and she came back to the vaulting world as a coach. In 2008, Cambry and her mother started Technique Equestrian Vaulting Club with five vaulters and her Haflinger mare, Miss Fire Opal. Miss Fire Opal was given to Cambry from a former teammate and good friend, Julie Young to help start their vaulting club. In the last five years, the club has grown to forty vaulters, seven horses, four lungers, and three coaches. These vaulters compete at the local, regional, and national level with multiple vaulters achieving individual and team National Championship titles. “Over the years, with the help from others, I have put pieces of myself back together and created a new identity from a wheelchair, but it wasn’t until winter 2012 that I truly felt whole again,” said Cambry. Her mother had been taking dressage lessons with David Macmillan to cross-train the vaulting horses and one Saturday her lesson partner canceled. She convinced Cambry to join her so they saddled-up Miss Fire Opal and Cambry got on. “I’m still not sure what happened during that lesson,” smiled Cambry, “I believe Opal and David opened Pandora’s box. I realized I could actually ride, I didn’t miss my legs anymore, and more than anything I missed riding and showing. Being able to ride after eight years of sitting on the sidelines changed me.” Cambry, 26, is now currently training as a Grade II para-dressage rider with David Macmillan in Saratoga Springs, Utah at Coyote Creek Stables. When she is in California, she trains with Brian Hafner with Silver Bay Stables out of Sonoma. Cambry recently purchased and started training her new para-dressage mount, Danish Warmblood, Markgaards Donnewind. He previously competed on the para-dressage Danish “B” Team. Together the duo is working hard towards attending the upcoming CPEDI3* events in order to qualify for the U.S. Para-Dressage Team selection trials for the 2014 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Normandy, France. Not only is Cambry working hard on her goals as a para-equestrian but she is also in her second year of graduate school at the University of Utah in their occupational therapy program. Cambry will graduate in May 2015 with her masters degree in Occupational Therapy. Her plan is to work with others with spinal cord injuries live full lives, return to what they love, and passionately follow their dreams. Cambry is also in the American Vaulting Associations judge’s training program working to be certified in 2016. When she is not studying, coaching her vaulters, or riding, she enjoys attending the University of Utah gymnastics meets and spending time with her family. “I honestly have the funniest family. I think the world of them,” commented Cambry. “My family means a lot to me. We’ve always been close, but I believe after my accident, we became even closer. My family members were there for me through that extremely difficult time in my life and helped make me stronger. I know they want the best for me and want to see me go after my dreams. They’re the first ones to tell me I can do anything. To have my parents, siblings, grandparents, uncles, aunts and cousins all support me in my para-dressage endeavors is an incredible feeling and I’m so blessed to have them.” Cambry did not just dip her toe into the sport of para-dressage, she is serious about her future with the sport. She is raising money through donations and sponsors through her website www.Cambry.org to offset the multiple costs of competing internationally. Cambry’s journey from vaulting to international para-dressage has been a whirlwind. She believes that vaulting helped her with her speedy recovery after her initial injury from a physical standpoint. It also healed her emotionally by being able to return to the sport as a coach. Today, she attributes a lot of her balance and harmony with the horse to her previous vaulting training. “I believe the sport both as a vaulter and as a coach helped prepare me to become a para-dressage rider,” noted Cambry. It was also her family, the donation of Miss Fire Opal from Julie Young, and for David Macmillan to believe in her as a rider that Cambry is following her dreams. “I remember after my accident waking up in the mornings and thinking that it was just a bad dream and it wasn’t real,” said Cambry. “I’d ask family and friends in my hospital room why we were there hoping the reason had changed. That it wasn’t my new life. Now I ask my friends and family to pinch me, because I can’t believe I’m lucky enough to have this life and the opportunities ahead of me. I’m enjoying the journey and excited for what the future holds.”

Marsha Cullen

14PFOC3262marsha cullenAbout Marsha Cullen: Cullen grew up in Missouri where she began riding at age 5. Cullen rode all types of horses and ponies and made her way into the western discipline before tackling dressage. During her early teen years she began to have a lot of pain in her wrists, hands, feet, ankles, and knees. The joints would swell, get red and stiffen. She suffered from fatigue and had to take frequent naps to make it through the day. In 1977, her mother took her to Dr. Browning in Joplin, Missouri where she was diagnosed with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis at age 16. Over the next four years Cullen lost range of motion and often suffered from painful, swollen joints forcing her to give up participation in track and volleyball. Missouri High School Rodeo became the only sport she could participate in after her diagnoses. Also in her teen years Cullen noticed brown patches of skin that became shiny and thick on her abdomen, arms and legs. In 1987 she was diagnosed with scleroderma, a connective tissue disease in the same family of diseases as rheumatoid arthritis.

Cullen moved from Missouri to Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1980 after marrying her now husband.  The two started a family and Cullen went on to graduate college at the University of Tulsa. During her second summer at college, she joined the Green Country Chapter of Oklahoma Dressage Society. While volunteering at the Green Country Dressage Classic she met Lynn Seidemann. Lynn, a two-time Paralympian, was wheeling around in a wheelchair and riding in the competition. “Being a disabled person myself, I was very curious how Lynn was able to do this,” noted Cullen. ” I didn’t think it would ever be possible for me to compete at a recognized show. So I introduced myself and she invited me to a

para-equestrian clinic at Flower Mounds Texas the following February. There I met Jonathan Wentz and Wendy Fryke.”
In 2010, Cullen drove from Tulsa, Oklahoma to Lexington, Kentucky during the WorldEquestrian Games by herself reclassified. Because of her lack of flexibility in her neck and upper back, plus other stiffness in her lower body and loss of range of motion in her joints, she is currently a Grade II  para-dressage rider.

In 2014, Marsha Cullen earned qualifying scores for the USEF Para-Equestrian DressageNational Championship held June 2-5, in Gladstone, NJ. Cullen competed with her own Latte. Cullen was also awarded The 2014 Sportsmanship Trophy. The Sportsmanship Trophy is a Perpetual Trophy awarded to a Para-Dressage Athlete competing at the National Championship who best personifies the high standards and virtues of integrity, sportsmanship, honor, courage, team spirit, good temper and unselfishness.

Radio Show Interview: http://uspea.org/june-26-2014-horse-radio-network-features-uset-foundations-sara-ike-and-para-dressage-rider-marsha-cullen/

October 14, 2014- U.S. Para-Equestrian Drivers Excel at Shady Oaks Farm CDE

United States Para-Equestrian Association

Media Contact: Lindsay McCall -Lindsay@uspea.org -USPEA, 3940 Verde Vista Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360- www.USPEA.org

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U.S. Para-Equestrian Drivers Excel at Shady Oaks Farm CDE

Lodi, California- October 14, 2014- Four Para-Equestrian Drivers competed at the Shady Oaks CDE September 18-21, 2014, in Lodi, California. Those athletes included Tracy Bowman competing in Preliminary Single Pony; Ginny Leal competing in Training Level Single Pony; Diane Kastama competing in Preliminary Pair; and Stefanie Putnam who competed in Preliminary Single Horse. The U.S. drivers made an incredible showing among 53 competitors and the support from the spectators, judges, and organizers was overwhelming. Drivers competed in Dressage, Cones, and the exciting Marathon Course over three days.

Tracy Bowman came in sixth place for Dressage, seventh for Marathon, fourth for Cones and fifth in the Preliminary Single Pony Division. Ginny Leal earned the second place accolade for Dressage and Cones and tied for first in the Marathon. Leal also took Reserve Champion for the Training Level Single Pony Division. Diane Kastama came in first for Dressage and Cones in Preliminary Pairs Division. Stefanie Putnam came in second in Dressage, second in Marathon, third in Cones, and first overall in the Preliminary Horse Division out of 14 contestants.  Putnam also won the whole Preliminary Division Championship (1st of 32 drivers) as well as the Reserve Championships for the whole Preliminary Division (including Ponies, Horses, and Pairs) for Dressage and Marathon and third in cones for the whole division (out of 32 drivers).

Tracy Bowman on the Marathon. Photo (c) Christie Bs Photography
Stefanie Putnam in Dressage. Photo (c) Christie Bs Photography
Diane Kastama competing in Cones. Photo (c) Christie Bs Photography

The last few years for the U.S Para-Equestrian Drivers have been outstanding. That includes the most recent 2014 FEI World Para-Equestrian Driving Championships which concluded in June at The Royal Estate in Sandringham, England. The U.S. team earned a Bronze finish with drivers Virginia Fitch, Diane Kastama and Veteran Robert Giles. Giles also garnered a Silver medal at the Championships.
United States Driving for the Disabled
For more information about United States Driving for the Disabled please go to www.USDFD.org.
USDFD facebook site

About the United States Para-Equestrian Association:

 

The USPEA is a network of riders, judges, national federation members, and equestrian enthusiasts.  The association gives athletes the ability to get involved and expand their knowledge and experience in the Para-Equestrian sport. The USPEA encourages Para-athletes to participate in all disciplines under the Para-Equestrian umbrella.

 

The USPEA is a recognized affiliate of the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) which serves as the National Governing Body for the equestrian sport.  This relationship between the USPEA and USEF is to encourage Para-Equestrian competitors, leisure riders, coaches, fans and enthusiasts to network and get involved with the entire equestrian sport.

 

Ultimately the goal of the USPEA is to foster growth in the Para-Equestrian discipline.  From growth in the number of participants to growth as a team, and growth in the experience and knowledge of all involved.  From local horse shows to international Paralympic Games, the USPEA provides Para-Equestrians the knowledge and resources needed to succeed.  The USPEA connects with the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI), the United States Dressage Federation (USDF), USA Reining, and USEF which provide Para-Equestrians the top equestrian resources.

 

In June 2010, the USPEA earned its 501 (c)(3) status which has encouraged supporters to help supply funding to the Para-Equestrian Team as a recognized affiliate of the United States Equestrian Federation(USEF). 

 

For more information about the USPEA please visit www.USPEA.org or contact USPEA President: Hope Hand by e-mail: hope@uspea.org or by phone: (610)356-6481.

 

To view an online version of this press release please visit: http://uspea.org/category/recent-uspea-press-news/

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Photos and Articles Copyright(c) 2014 United States Para-Equestrian Association. All Rights Reserved.
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October 13, 2014 -2nd Annual Disabled U.S. Armed Forces Day October 25

United States Para-Equestrian Association

Media Contact: Lindsay McCall -Lindsay@uspea.org -USPEA, 3940 Verde Vista Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360- www.USPEA.org

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2nd Annual Disabled U.S. Armed Forces Day October 25

Wylie, TX – October 13, 2014 - North Texas Equestrian Center will host the 2nd Annual Disabled U.S. Armed Forces Day October 25, 2014, at 1 PM in Wylie, Texas. Kai Handt, the U.S. Paralympic Equestrian Coach and Para-Dressage Technical Advisor/Chef d’Equipe will be showcasing a demonstration by U.S. Air Force Veteran and Para-Equestrian Dressage athlete Derrick Perkins. There will also be appearances from rider(s) of the 2014 U.S. World Equestrian Games Para-Dressage Team.

Also featured is an introductional seminar about the Para-Equestrian discipline. New members of the Wounded Warrior and other Disabled U.S. Veteran programs will be introduced to the exciting Paralympic Equestrian Dressage Sport . Veterans from all branches of the service are invited in addition to interested future para-dressage athletes. All are welcome to attend this free seminar including auditors.

At the inaugural U.S. Armed Forces Day in April 2014, Kai Handt explained to those in attendance what is required to be a competitive Para-Dressage rider and how veterans can qualify for the United States Olympic Committee and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veteran Assistance Program for Para-Equestrian Dressage athletes. In addition to Handt’s informative presentation, Tina Wentz, FEI Classifier and USPEA Board member explained the FEI Para-Equestrian Classification system and how to get started in Para-Dressage. Wentz will once again be on hand in Texas to discuss this topic and more.

U.S. Air Force disabled veteran Derrick Perkins on NTEC Hans. Photo copyright Lindsay Y. McCall
U.S. Air Force disabled veteran Derrick Perkins on NTEC Hans. Photo copyright Lindsay Y. McCall

History of the Paralympic Movement and the Dressage Sport in the Military:

The unique relationship between the military and the Paralympic sport began with Sir Ludwig Guttmann, known as the Father of the Paralympics. He used wheelchair sport as a way to physically & psychologically rehabilitate soldiers who had suffered spinal cord injuries in WWII. The first competition in 1948 started small with one sport but caught the eye of the Olympic organizers. Twelve years later in 1960 the first Paralympics were held with 9 sports and twenty-one countries participating.

Dressage roots go as far back as Xenophon (430 – 355BC) in Greece who developed a training method for complex military movements for their cavalry horses. Later in the late 18th century and early 19th century with the shift from heavy to light cavalry, dressage was developed to keep their horses fit, agile, and ready for battle.

These two movements came together in the 1970′s with the development of Para-Dressage and the inclusion of this discipline into the Paralympics in 1996 in Atlanta.

2nd Annual Disabled U.S. Armed Forces Day Fast Facts:

WHAT: 2nd Annual Disabled U.S. Armed Forces Day

WHERE:  North Texas Equestrian Center, 1765 Southview Drive, Wylie, TX, 75098

WHEN: October 25, 2014

CONTACT INFORMATION: 972-442-7544

WEBSITE: www.USWarmblood.com

For more information about the United States Olympic Committee and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veteran Assistance Program for Para-Equestrian Dressage Athletes please go to:

About the United States Para-Equestrian Association:

The USPEA is a network of riders, judges, national federation members, and equestrian enthusiasts.  The association gives athletes the ability to get involved and expand their knowledge and experience in the Para-Equestrian sport. The USPEA encourages Para-athletes to participate in all disciplines under the Para-Equestrian umbrella.

The USPEA is a recognized affiliate of the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) which serves as the National Governing Body for the equestrian sport.  This relationship between the USPEA and USEF is to encourage Para-Equestrian competitors, leisure riders, coaches, fans and enthusiasts to network and get involved with the entire equestrian sport.

Ultimately the goal of the USPEA is to foster growth in the Para-Equestrian discipline.  From growth in the number of participants to growth as a team, and growth in the experience and knowledge of all involved.  From local horse shows to international Paralympic Games, the USPEA provides Para-Equestrians the knowledge and resources needed to succeed.  The USPEA connects with the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI), the United States Dressage Federation (USDF), USA Reining, and USEF which provide Para-Equestrians the top equestrian resources.

In June 2010, the USPEA earned its 501 (c)(3) status which has encouraged supporters to help supply funding to the Para-Equestrian Team as a recognized affiliate of the United States Equestrian Federation(USEF). 

For more information about the USPEA please visit www.USPEA.org or contact USPEA President: Hope Hand by e-mail: hope@uspea.org or by phone: (610)356-6481.

To view an online version of this press release please visit: http://uspea.org/category/recent-uspea-press-news/

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter View our videos on YouTube

USPEA

Photos and Articles Copyright(c) 2014 United States Para-Equestrian Association. All Rights Reserved.
If you have received this e-mail and no longer wish to receive any e-mails regarding the USPEA please click on the Unsubscribe link below.  USPEA will only send e-mails that are news related to the USPEA.

 

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